Saturday, March 24, 2018

RECIPE: Thai Risotto

I make risotto a lot.  It's my go-to meal when I didn't plan ahead.  Even though it's technically Italian, I season it a million different ways.  Here's one I threw together from leftovers.  Although it doesn't look that appetizing, it was delicious!



1/2 recipe Donna's Sesame Cabbage
3 T. lard or tallow
1 large onion, halved and then sliced 1/8" thick
1 medium carrot sliced 1/8" thick
1 T. minced ginger
1 T. minced garlic
1/2 t. hot pepper flakes or to taste
1.5 cups short grain rice
6-8 cups water
1/2 t. kefir lime zest 
2 t. salt
1 pound left over meat, ground or shredded (I used pork)
1/2 green pepper, seeded and minced
1/4 c. coconut aminos
2 T. toasted sesame oil
2 T. toasted sesame seeds
2 T. lime basil chiffonade
1/4 c. cream
Opt for serving: Thai dipping sauce

Melt 1 T lard on med-high heat and saute onions until brown.  Remove and reserve.
In same pan, add 1 T. lard and saute carrots, ginger, garlic and pepper flakes for 1 minute.
Add 1 T. lard, add rice, and stir for 30 seconds.  Do not let rice brown.
Add 1/2 cup of water and increase heat to high.
Stir constantly (gently, not vigorously) to prevent sticking.
When you can see the bottom of the pan as you stir, add another 1/2 cup of water.
Add the salt and the lime zest.
Continue adding water in 1/2 cup increments whenever you can see the bottom of the pan.
As the rice cooks it will turn from opaque to transparent.
Taste it occasionally to see how it's coming along.  
When the rice is almost cooked, lower the heat to medium.
Stir in the reserved onions, sesame cabbage and the pork and stir until heated through.
Taste to make sure the rice is now cooked through.
If it isn't, add another 1/4 - 1/2 c water and stir until cooked.
Add the remaining ingredients, stir to combine, and adjust seasoning.
Serve with Thai dipping sauce.  
.


RECIPE: Donna's Sesame Cabbage

Submitted by one of our farm members!  The first time I made this I cut the cabbage too thick and it took forever to cook! 

Donna's Sesame Cabbage



1 medium cabbage
2 T. sesame oil (unrefined or toasted or a combination)
OPT: 1 T. toasted sesame oil for serving
OPT: 1 T. sesame seeds for serving
1 t. salt

Toast the sesame seeds in a dry pan until lightly browned.  Remove from heat and set aside.

Slice the cabbage in half, remove the core, then slice each half into 3 pieces.  Cut or shred each piece into 1/16" slices.

Heat the unrefined oil on high, add the cabbage and cook, stirring occasionally, until it's lightly browned and cooked but still a bit crunchy.  About 5 minutes.

Remove from heat and stir in toasted sesame oil, sesame seeds, and salt. 

Friday, March 23, 2018

Two calves born this week!

Two calves born this week!

The calves stay with their mothers until they're weaned.    



Thursday, March 15, 2018

RECIPE: Easy Ranch Dressing

Have you ever looked at the label for Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing? So many chemicals!

Source: Hidden Valley

If you make my recipe with purchased mayonnaise, even if it's organic it will still contain refined (rancid) oil, CAFO eggs, fructose, salt and MSG.   Please use homemade mayo!

It is possible to buy organic sour cream without additives.  We use Wallaby's (organic cultured pasteurized cream. live and active probiotic cultures: L.acidophilus, B.bifidum, L.cremoris, L.lactis.). Make sure the brand you use contains only cream and cultures.  Avoid carrageenan!

Most Ranch Dressing recipes are made with buttermilk but I rarely have that on hand so I use milk thickened with lemon juice.  If you make your own buttermilk, or buy buttermilk without additives, use that instead of the milk/lemon combination. 

Easy Homemade Ranch Dressing


1/2 c. homemade mayonnaise
6 T. sour cream, preferably homemade
1/4 c. whole milk
2 T. fresh lemon juice
1 T. minced shallot or chives
1 T. minced fresh parsley
1 T. minced fresh dill
1 t. fresh lemon juice
1 garlic clove minced or grated using a microplane
1/2 t. himalayan pink salt
opt: pinch cayenne

Mix 2 T. lemon juice into the milk and let stand several minutes until milk thickens.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the remaining ingredients.  Add the thickened milk slowly until the sauce reaches the desired consistency.  You may not use it all.

Taste and adjust seasoning.  Cover and let sit 30 minutes for the flavor to develop. 


NOTE:
When I make this in winter I use herbs that I've frozen.   The photo above was made with frozen chives, parsley, and dill.  If you make this a lot, chop the herbs and then freeze them packed tightly into in ice cube trays.  You won't waste the extra herbs and you can use the cubes when you can't get fresh herbs. 









Wednesday, March 14, 2018

RECIPE: Mashed Rutabagas (or turnips) Stellina

Although I haven't made this recipe yet I'm posting it because the farm store only has rutabagas through April and the recipe looks delicious!  I found it in the current issue of Fiddlehead .  The recipe is by Marc Bouchard, executive chef at Stellina Restaurant in Watertown , MA. (No link, I took photos of the magazine article with my phone.)

Here's the reason why I want to try it (please let me know if you do):

  

Here's the recipe (use fat, not oil):
Mashed Rutabagas (or turnips) Stellina

RECIPE: Bolognese Meat Sauce with Hidden Nutrition

According to Dr. Thomas Cowan, anthroposophical doctor and former member of our CSA (before he moved to CA):
"... taking our lead from healthy traditional peoples, we should strive to eat at least 10 to 12 different plants a day: some roots (carrots, beets), some stems (celery, Brussels sprouts), some leaves (kale, chard), and some fruits and flowers (tomatoes, zucchini). Eating different plant parts and colors is the surest way to avail ourselves of all the nutrients plants have to offer."
This recipe - which looks and tastes like a traditional bolognese sauce - is loaded with 15 different plants.  It's another recipe that most people won't have all the ingredients now but I'm hoping it will inspire you to preserve them this summer.  Using home-preserved ingredients it comes together in 30 minutes!

The recipe makes a LOT - enough for 3-4 pounds of pasta depending on your preferred meat:pasta ratio. It will keep for several weeks in the fridge (stored in glass, not plastic) and it can be frozen.  Just remember to add the EVOO after reheating.

Barb's Bolognese Meat Sauce with 15 Plants
 Makes enough for 3-4 pounds of pasta


1 T. ghee, lard or tallow
1.5 - 2 t. fennel seeds*
1 pint home-canned onions, carrots and celeriac *
1 quart home-canned ground beef (about 1.5#) *
1 quart home-canned ground pork (about 1.5#) *
3 18-oz jars tomato passata 
1 t. wild fennel pollen
3-4 large cloves garlic, pressed
1 t. opal basil, rubbed between your palms to crumble
1/2 t. oregano, rubbed between your palms to crumble
1/4 t. powdered rosemary
1/4 t. cayenne
4 t. Himalayan pink salt
1 T. Dr. Cowan's perennial greens powder (tree collards, malabar spinach, gynura procumbens, moringa leaves)
1 T. Dr. Cowan's burdock root powder
* The fennel I use is very pungent. If yours is old, or milder, you may need 2 t. or more.  The sauce should be redolent of fennel, as if you used Italian sausage.

For Serving:
2 T. chopped Italian parsley
cooked pasta
extra virgin olive oil
opt: grated parmesan cheese
opt: pepper flakes

Melt fat on med-high heat and saute fennel seeds until light brown.  Add onions, carrots, celeriac and garlic and stir to combine.  Add remaining ingredients, stir well, and bring to a simmer.  Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for at least 30 minutes to meld the flavors.  Stir periodically to insure it's not sticking.

If you need to make it earlier in the day, it can simmer for several hours (make sure it doesn't stick or burn, add water as needed.)

Stir in parsley and serve with pasta and EVOO.  The recipe is very low in fat so be generous with the EVOO.  Parmesan and pepper flakes are optional.

I made this for a vegetable hater who doesn't even like seasoning herbs and he inhaled it, asking for seconds and thirds.  If you like vegetables, double all the herbs and powders.   I will often stir in some chopped cooked spinach right before serving to increase the nutritional content even further. 

* NOTE:  If you don't have canned onions-carrots-celeriac you can use 1 c. minced onions, and 1/2 c. each of carrot and celeriac pulp.  You can use celery instead but don't use celery pulp, it's too stringy.  Saute all three of these after the fennel seeds with an additional 1 T. fat until soft and slightly caramelized, about 15 min.

If you don't have canned ground meat, add fresh ground meat to the pan after the onions are cooked and before you add the tomato sauce.  Saute until cooked through, about 15 minutes, then add the remaining ingredients.  You will need to cook it much longer- about 2 hours - to tenderize the meat, adding water as needed so it doesn't stick or burn.  The sauce is best with a combination of beef and pork but you can use all beef.




Thursday, March 8, 2018

RECIPE: Easy Moussaka with Eggplant and Potato

We're had a massive snowstorm last night and I wanted comfort food so I made moussaka using as many home-preserved ingredients as possible to reduce the amount of prep work that moussaka normally requires.  I'm posting it knowing that most people won't have these ingredients now, but I hope it will motivate you to preserve them next summer. 

In the photo below you see some of the ingredients I used...canned tomatoes and lamb, frozen onions and eggplant, and potatoes from the farm store...and you can see the baking dish I first chose was way too small.  I used a bigger one, a 9x13 oval, and even that was too small!  Next time I'll use 10x14 oval.  A 9x13 rectangular pan would have been perfect.

Biodynamic Ingredients
Moussaka is a Greek dish made with ground lamb, tomatoes, a cheesy white sauce, and a vegetable - either eggplant, zucchini, or potatoes.  I've always made it with both eggplant and potatoes, and it's delicious that way (even though I don't normally eat potatoes).  Using home-prepared ingredients did reduce the amount of work, but moussaka is always a labor-intensive endeavor!

Easy Eggplant and Potato Moussaka


1.5 pounds ground lamb, home canned (i.e. cooked and tender)
1.5 c peeled tomatoes, home canned, drained (reserve juice for another use)
1.5 c. fresh breadcrumbs (3/4 cups dry)
1 large onion sauteed in ghee, lard, tallow, or EVCO
2 large cloves garlic, minced
3 t. Himalayan pink salt
3 T. chopped parsley
1/4 t. cayenne
1/4 t. ground allspice
1.5 t.* Vietnamese cinnamon (Ceylon is too subtle, if you use it, you will need 3 t.)
2 medium potatoes
5 Japanese (long) eggplants, roasted in their skins
3 T. ghee
3 T. flour
1.5 c milk
3 egg yolks, lightly beaten
1.5 c cheese (I used quark but you can use grated hard cheese if you prefer)
1/4 t. freshly grated nutmeg
1 t. salt

9 x 13 rectangular baking pan (or 10x14 oval), bottom and sides greased with ghee
11 x 17 jelly-roll pan or cookie sheet wrapped in foil

Preheat oven to 350.

Cut each potato in half lengthwise (creating the thinnest halves possible so they cook quickly) and simmer under water until they're cooked through but not mushy, 10-15 minutes depending on how thick the slabs are.  Remove from water and allow to cool.

In the same pan, melt the ghee on medium heat and saute the flour for a few minutes.  Reduce the heat to low and gradually add the milk, stirring vigorously after each addition so no lumps form.  Cook, stirring, until thickened and creamy.  Add the cheese and whisk until smooth.

Stir 1/4 c. of the sauce into the egg yolks, then stir the yolks into the sauce in the pan.  Add the nutmeg and salt, taste and adjust seasoning, and set aside.

Cut the potatoes into 3/8" slabs and cover the bottom of your (greased) baking pan.  

In a large bowl, mix the remaining ingredients (lamb, tomatoes, onions, garlic, seasonings and breadcrumbs).  The breadcrumbs soak up the liquid the eggplant will exude; omit them at your peril.  Taste and adjust seasoning then spread over the potatoes.  

Cut the eggplants in half lengthwise and layer over the meat, flesh side down. Spread the cheese sauce over the top. (I had a little bit of everything left over due to the pan being too small.)

Place the baking dish on the foil covered jelly-roll pan and bake in the center of the oven for 1 hour until the top is brown and crispy.  As you can see, mine boiled over quite a bit.  If you use the right size baker you may not need the jelly-roll pan, but the stuff crusted on the sides was delicious.

I served it with radish sprouts mixed with EVOO, lemon juice and salt.  

NOTES:  
*I like a LOT of cinnamon in this dish.  My jar was almost empty and I needed 1.5 t. to get the flavor I wanted.  If your jar is fresh, or if you want a subtler flavor, you could probably get away with 1 t. 

I use Japanese eggplants because they are not bitter, and the skins are very soft.  I roast them whole and then freeze them whole.  

In summer, when onions are abundant, I saute them and then freeze them in pint bags.

If you don't have home-preserved ingredients, you will need to prepare the eggplants and the meat sauce.  There are many recipes on the internet illustrating these steps.   Trust me: home-preserved is the way to go.

This is how much snow we got:






Monday, March 5, 2018

RECIPE: Carrot Pancakes with Thai Dipping Sauce

Original recipe: Carrot Pancakes with Salted Yogurt

Carrot Pancakes with Thai Dipping Sauce
 Makes 25-30 1.5" appetizer size pancakes


Carrot Pancakes
6 eggs beaten to blend
3 c. juicer pulp or finely grated carrots
6 T. chopped cilantro (I used frozen)
6 T. quinoa flour
2 t. himalayan pink salt
6 T. ghee, lard or tallow

Mix the carrots with the cilantro and flour.  Add the eggs and salt and mix to combine.  Set aside for at least 15 minutes to allow the flour to hydrate.  (I have let it set as long as 2 hours)

In a shallow frying pan (I use an omelet pan) melt 1 T fat on medium.  Using a tablespoon drop the carrot mixture into the hot fat.  Cook until medium brown, about 1 minute, then flip and cook another minute.  Remove to paper towel lined plate. Repeat with remaining batter, adding fat as needed so they don't stick (you need quite a bit of fat to prevent sticking - don't be stingy!).

Serve with dipping sauce (recipe below), ranch dressing, or yogurt, garnished with spicy green salad.

These pancakes cook very quickly, so the carrots will be close to raw, which is one reason I love them - I'm eating warm, cooked food but getting the nutrition of raw!  That's also the reason I prefer to use juicer pulp over grated - they're much easier to chew when I use pulp.


Thai Dipping Sauce (Original recipe: Thai Dipping Sauce)
I make this with almond butter, rather than peanut, because while peanuts are cancer protective for blood type A, they aren't good for any other blood type.  Plus, I'm able to get biodynamic almonds which makes them my nut of choice for any nut-based dish.

1/2 c. almond butter (please buy one containing nothing but almonds!)
2 T. soy sauce or tamari (I used miso tamari)
2 T. dark sesame oil
2 T. apple cider vinegar or pickled ginger juice
1 T. ginger grated on a fine microplane
1 T. garlic grated on a fine microplane
1/2 t. hot sauce or to taste
1.5 t. fresh lime juice
1/4 c. water
1 t. sugar
1/2 t. salt

Combine the dipping sauce ingredients in a small bowl and whisk thoroughly.  Set aside for at least 2 hours for the flavors to meld.

Addendum:  I made these with purple carrots and they were just as good!  They don't look as good, though, because the carrots turned everything brown:

Purple Carrot Pancakes



They were delicious served with Broccoli Slaw and Horseradish Sauce:

Purple Carrot pancakes with Broccoli Slaw and Horseradish Sauce




Thursday, March 1, 2018

RECIPE: Veal ragout with carrots and parsnips

There was veal stew meat for sale in the farm store last week so I decided to make one of my favorite recipes, Veal Ragout.  I usually make this with onions, carrots, parsnips and celery but you can use celeriac and/or potatoes in addition or instead. This recipe can be made entirely with our farm's products.

I used  3 pounds of veal but I have written the recipe for 1 pound which can be scaled up as needed.   3 pounds of meat will yield 8-10 servings.  Using a (stainless, NOT aluminum) pressure cooker I can make this in about 1 hour.  I serve it with Eden Foods truly wild rice.

Veal Ragout with Carrots, Parsnips, Cream, and Tarragon



INGREDIENTS

1 pound veal stew
1/2 pound carrots
1/2 pound parsnips
2 ribs celery (or 1/2 pound celeriac)
1 c. onion, sliced 1/2" thick and then quartered
2 T. ghee or tallow, divided
2 c. veal broth or water
1/4 c. heavy cream
1 t. tarragon leaves
1/4 t. thyme leaves
pinch of cayenne (this cuts through the richness of the cream)
1 t. pink salt
Optional: 1/3 c cooked peas

DIRECTIONS

Cut veal into 1/2 - 3/4 " cubes (this helps tenderize it faster).  In a saute pan, melt 1 T. ghee on high heat and brown the veal.  Transfer to a stainless pressure cooker, add the veal broth or water, and cook under pressure for 30 minutes.  Let pressure come down naturally.  (If you have time, you can simmer the veal on the stove for 2-3 hours until tender.)

While the veal is cooking, clean the vegetables and cut into 1" pieces.  Melt 1 T. ghee on med-high and brown the onions, then the carrots, then the parsnips, pushing each one to the side of the pan before adding the next.  Add the veal and all accumulated juices, tarragon, thyme, salt and cayenne.  Add enough water to barely submerge, then simmer, partially covered, on medium heat until the vegetables are tender - about 30 minutes.  If the sauce is too thin, raise the heat to evaporate some of it.  Stir in the peas if you're using them.

(If you aren't going to use the pressure cooker then cook the vegetables first and remove them from the pan before searing and simmering the veal, then add them back in for the last 30 minutes.)

Make the rice while the vegetables are cooking.

Turn off the heat, add the cream, and serve with rice or bread.
I love it with Eden Foods truly wild rice, my husband prefers basmati.






RECIPE: Mayonnaise

I thought it would be appropriate that my first recipe post be for MAYONNAISE, something that almost everyone loves, that most people buy prepared (which always contains unhealthy refined oils - yes, even Primal Kitchen uses refined avocado oil), and that is VERY EASY TO PREPARE AT HOME!

Link to original recipe with excellent video: Two Minute Mayonnaise
Link to original recipe with excellent instructions: Foolproof Homemade Mayonnaise
(don't use the oils recommended in either of the above recipes)

My Immersion Blender Mayonnaise
 (a combination of several recipes plus experience)
(recipe for use in a regular blender or food processor at the end)
whole-egg mayonnaise   egg-yolk-only mayonnaise

NOTE: It is CRUCIAL to use a tall narrow container slightly wider than the head of your immersion blender.  I use a pint size Ball jar.  You can use the markings on the jar to measure the oil after the other ingredients have been added.

Wash the egg shells gently with soap and the hottest water you can tolerate (I use rubber gloves).  Rinse and dry, then separate the yolks.  (Save the shells if you grow tomatoes.)
The yolks will be easier to separate without breaking if the eggs are cold.
You can save and use the whites for meringue, macaroons, or other cooked applications.


INGREDIENTS

4 large egg yolks (raw egg whites have an antinutrient, avedin, so I don't use them)
1 T. water
1 t. mustard powder (prepared mustard contains corn-derived or  mold-derived citric acid)
1/2 t. Himalayan pink salt
1-2 T. lemon juice (use lime juice for chili-lime or chipotle-lime mayo)
Optional seasoning - be creative or see below for our favorites
  • 1 clove garlic, OR 1 t. horseradish, OR 2 t. additional mustard powder, OR 1 jalapeno, OR 1 t. chipotle powder, OR 1 t. harissa,  OR 1/4 c. chive blossoms, OR nothing
3/4 c. UNREFINED oil, see below for options
  • Eden Foods unrefined safflower oil emulsifies well and will keep without separating
  • Unrefined almond and walnut oils do not emulsify well and need to be used ASAP
  • Unrefined sesame oil has decent emulsifying properties but a strong flavor 
  • EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) emulsifies well but the blades can damage it and make it bitter.  It's best made by handDo NOT use refined (light) olive oil. 

DIRECTIONS
See note above for how to prepare the egg yolks.

Layer into container in the order specified above.

Pour oil on top and allow to settle for 15 seconds. Place head of immersion blender at bottom of cup and turn it on high speed. Do not pulse or move the head. As mayonnaise forms, slowly tilt and lift the head of the immersion blender until all oil is emulsified. Adjust salt and lemon juice. Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

This makes a creamy mayonnaise.  For stiffer mayonnaise, use a 1/4c more oil.
In the comparison photo above I used winter eggs, which are not as dark yellow as summer eggs, so the difference between whole-egg and yolk-only is not as dramatic. 

I will often stir in a tablespoon of harissa into the prepared mayo.  


BLENDER or FOOD PROCESSOR instructions

If you don't have an immersion blender you can use a regular blender or a food processor, it will just take longer.  Put everything except the oil into the work bowl and process until well blended.  With the machine running, pour the oil in through the feed tube  v-e-r-y  s-l-o-w-l-y,  the stream should be no thicker than an old-fashioned pencil lead.  When it starts to emulsify you can add the oil in a gradually thicker stream.









Label ingredients I avoid

Work In Progress - I will be updating this post as necessary.

There are times when I can't avoid purchasing packaged food like chips, or prepared food like cheese, ham and sausage.  In addition to anything that is obviously a chemical (e.g. most acronyms), listed below are the seemingly innocuous label ingredients that are deal breakers for me - if any one is on the label, I won't buy the item.

I avoid ingredients made from corn, soy,  and potatoes because 99% are GMO and high in pesticides.  These non-organic ingredients are allowed in 'organic' products!  If you're allergic to gluten, peanuts or some other substance you will need a specific list for that.

Condensed List with minimal descriptions (for my purse):

ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS OR COLORS - anything artificial is made with chemicals
BAKING POWDER - contains aluminum (unless it's labelled aluminum-free)
CARRAGEENAN and POLIGEENAN - carcinogenic, inflammatory, highly processed
CARAMEL COLOR -  usually synthetic, or made from GMO corn
CITRIC ACID - preservative often made from GMO corn and/or black mold
CORN anything - usually made from GMO corn
ENRICHED or FORTFIED - contains synthetic ingredients
GUM anything - guar, xanthan, etc... - might be OK but highly processed
HYDROGENATED anything - damaged oils that often contain MSG
MSG - excitotoxin that damages your brain
MIXED TOCOPHEROLS - often made from GMO soy
NITRATES and NITRITES - these are carcinogenic preservatives
OIL - any refined oil will be rancid.  Coconut oil is the only 'oil' that's safe in packaged foods. PARABENS - preservatives that disrupt endocrine functions
PECTIN - usually derived from apples high in pesticide residue
PEPPER, BLACK - not a deal breaker but acidifying and often moldy
PEPPER, HOT - must be organic or it will be very high in pesticide residue
PROTEIN anything (pea, whey, etc...) - over-processed ingredient usually contains MSG
SALT - not a deal breaker but I prefer sea salt or salt free
POTATO anything - usually made from GMO potatoes
SODIUM LAUREL SULFATE (SLS) - carcinogenic lathering agent
SODIUM LAURETH SULFATE (SLES) - carcinogenic lathering agent
SOY LECITHIN - made from GMO soy
SUNFLOWER LECITHIN - unless it's organic it will be high in pesticides
SPICES - usually contains MSG - I want to know exactly which spices are used
VANILLIN - artificial vanilla flavor made from paper plant waste
YEAST - usually grown on GMO-corn substrate


Detailed list where I will be adding information as I learn it:

ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS OR COLORS (including 'caramel') - anything artificial is made with chemicals.  Unless the flavor/color is labeled organic, it was made from conventional fruit high in pesticide residue.

BAKING POWDER - contains aluminum (unless it's labelled aluminum free)

BHA - carcinogenic preservative

CARRAGEENAN and POLIGEENAN - carcinogenic, inflammatory, highly processed.  Derived from seaweed, the raw seaweed is safe, but not the version found in processed food.

CITRIC ACID - preservative often made from GMO corn and/or black mold

CORN STARCH - from GMO corn

ENRICHED or FORTFIED - contains synthetic ingredients

GUM anything - https://chriskresser.com/harmful-or-harmless-guar-gum-locust-bean-gum-and-more/

HFCS - high fructose corn syrup

HYDROGENATED anything - damaged oils that often contain MSG

MSG - excitotoxin that damages your brain

MIXED TOCOPHEROLS - often made from GMO soy

NITRATES and NITRITES - these are carcinogenic preservatives

OIL - any refined oil will be rancid.  Coconut oil is the only 'oil' that's safe in packaged foods.

PARABENS - preservatives that disrupt endocrine functions

PECTIN - usually derived from apples high in pesticide residue

PEPPER, BLACK - not a deal breaker but acidifying and often moldy

PEPPER, HOT - must be organic or it will be very high in pesticide residue

POTATO STARCH - from GMO potatoes

PROBIOTICS - usually grown on conventional dairy substrate

PROTEIN anything (pea, whey, etc...) - over-processed ingredient usually contains MSG

SALT - this is not a deal breaker but I prefer sea salt to table salt

SODIUM LAUREL SULFATE (SLS) - carcinogenic lathering agent.  Morrocco Method blog post details the dangers and lists the ways it's hidden on labels:
This list is compiled by the US Department of Health & Human Services
• Sodium lauryl sulfate
• Sulfuric acid monododecyl ester sodium salt
• Sodium dodecyl sulfate
• Dodecyl sulfate, sodium salt
• Sodium lauryl sulfate ether
• Sodium n-dodecyl sulfate
• Sodium Lauryl Sulfate

SODIUM LAURETH SULFATE (SLES) - carcinogenic lathering agent.  Morrocco Method blog post details the dangers and lists the ways it's hidden on labels: 
This list is compiled by the US Department of Health & Human Services
Sodium dodecylpoly (oxyethylene) sulfate
• Sodium lauryl sulfate ethoxylate
• Sodium polyoxyethylene lauryl ether sulfate
• Sodium laureth-8 sulfate
• Laureth-8 carboxylic acid, sodium salt
• PEG-5 lauryl ether sulfate sodium salt
• PEG-7 lauryl ether sulfate sodium salt
• PEG-8 lauryl ether sulfate sodium salt
• PEG-12 lauryl ether sulfate sodium salt
• Polyethylene glycol 5 lauryl ether sulfate sodium salt
• Polyethylene glycol 7 lauryl ether sulfate sodium salt
• Polyethylene glycol 12 lauryl ether sulfate sodium salt
• Polyethylene glycol 400 lauryl ether sulfate sodium salt
• Polyethylene glycol 600 lauryl ether sulfate sodium salt
• Sodium laureth 5 sulfate
• Sodium laureth 7 sulfate
• Sodium laureth 12 sulfate
• Sodium lauryl ether sulfate

SOY LECITHIN - made from GMO soy (non-organic sunflower lecithin is high in pesticides)

SPICES - this usually contains MSG - if there are spices in the food, I want to know which ones

VANILLIN - artificial vanilla flavor made from paper plant waste

YEAST - usually grown on GMO-corn substrate